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Wichita State's independent, student-run news source

The Sunflower

Wichita State's independent, student-run news source

The Sunflower

REVIEW: Kali Uchis’ ‘ORQUÍDEAS’ is the perfect album for protecting your peace

Photo+courtesy+of+Gellen+Records
Photo courtesy of Gellen Records

You may know her from the incredibly popular song “telepatía,” but Kali Uchis’ talent spans beyond that. Uchis is much stronger than that song, and she has proved it with her sixth album, “ORQUÍDEAS.”

Uchis’ music is heavily influenced by her Latin roots; she cites the music of the 1960s as an influence as well. 

“ORQUÍDEAS” is a decently long album, with 14 songs and a listening time of 44 minutes. In those 44 minutes, Uchis gives listeners a manual to being an unbothered bad bitch, encouraging her female audience to lean into their untapped and unbridled female rage. 

The entire album is hit after hit, but I have three easy favorites on the album: “¿Como Así?”, “Te Mata” and “Muñekita.”

“¿Como Así?”

This song is the opener of the album and does a great job of setting the tone for the rest of the tracks. It details knowing your worth and never settling for less than that, especially with the lyrics:

“Baby, if you know my worth
For my love, you have to work
And what’s worth it.” 

It’s the perfect hype song with affirmations to know who you are. If you ever forget, Uchis is here to remind you. 

“Te Mata”

This is a slower song on the album, and Uchis’ Latin roots are clearly heard in the background music. Sung in Spanish, “Te Mata” tells the story of escaping from a neglectful relationship and the struggle to find your self-worth after escaping an abusive relationship. 

The other perspective portrays Uchis as the villain because she’s obviously the bad guy for finding her peace. Uchis takes it a step further by embracing the dichotomy and comes out on top. 

“Muñekita” 

This song, a collaboration between Uchis, El Alfa, and JT, is the perfect club anthem. It’s fast-paced, and though I can’t dance, I found myself shaking my hips to the beat. The title translates to “Little Doll” and tells the story of a woman who appreciates money and gifts. 

Though it’s her latest album, “ORQUÍDEAS” is the perfect place to start with Uchis’ discography, and after, expand your tastes even further with the rest of her music. You don’t need to know Spanish to enjoy her music; take it from me. 

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About the Contributor
Maleah Evans, Reporter
Maleah Evans is a second-year reporter for The Sunflower. They previously worked as a copy editor. Evans is a sophomore, majoring in history with a minor in anthropology. They plan to pursue a career as a museum curator.

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