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The Sunflower

Letter to the Editor — Jesse Allen

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Dearest Shockers,

It is abhorrent to see the lengths the current Student Government Association along with the administration of Wichita State University will go to silence the deeply rooted issues regarding race and intolerance on this campus. A hate crime occurred and neither the SGA president nor the president of this university have offered a public apology; regardless of legality, showing empathy towards students — whether they are former student leaders or anyone for that matter — is not incriminating. In a few short months, faculty, administrators, staff, students, and guests of this university will be permitted to carry firearms on campus. Now, more than ever, it is critical that all people affiliated with WSU must set aside their political leanings, and address the problems our non-white peers face everyday.

The gains achieved by the We the Students and the Occupy SGA protesters are nothing short of an accomplishment. Regardless of sincerity, President Hungate has reneged her previous bigoted statements and publicly declared black lives matter. There will be wider representation for traditionally marginalized students in SGA. Finally, and perhaps most significantly, the United We Stand cabinet will receive the diversity trainings that they so desperately need.

But this is not enough. In the town hall meeting on Thursday, May 11, staff of the Office of Diversity and Inclusion praised diversity trainings, but warned that they will never be enough to fix ongoing systemic issues of racial intolerance. More must be done and more must be demanded.

The protesters that sat for two days outside the SGA office did not do so out of clashing ideologies regarding what some flippantly call “identity politics.” Rather, they did so out of fear of what will happen next on our campus. When the protesters asked for Ms. Hungate’s resignation, they did so in belief that her removal from office would be the safest option for our students of color. These students do not have the luxury of living in a world that ensures their education and well-being. Ms. Hungate’s refusal to even recuse herself places an enormous responsibility on all of us to be conscious of how we relate to and interact with people of differing backgrounds.

Finally, I’d like to take this time time to recognize all of the Occupy SGA protesters. Whether you were there for the long haul, stepped in and out, or simply dropped off cookies in between your finals, I say this to you: you have the ability to see what others do not. You have the bravery to call out what others have remained silent upon. It is important to bear witness. In solidarity, I thank you and will forever have your backs.

Sincerely,

Jesse Allen

7 Comments
  • Mr. Jones

    So a hate crime was committed even though all the facts aren’t out? I guess in your utopia you are guilty until proven innocent?

    [Reply]

    Mr. Jones Reply:

    The Occupy group is an attempt to dismantle a democratic process, I believe that is something that every murderous revolutionary has done in the past.

    [Reply]

    A student who gladly left wsu Reply:

    Get off your high horse and stop pretending you know better than the protesters.

    Yours sincerely,
    -a proud Republican

    [Reply]

  • Kevin

    The Office of Diversity and Inclusion is a large waste of money. It’s nothing more than a social club. Shut it down.

    [Reply]

  • Tex

    “It is abhorrent to see the lengths the current Student Government Association along with the administration of Wichita State University will go to silence the deeply rooted issues regarding race and intolerance on this campus.”

    Right, Paige is trying to “silence” everyone by engaging in a dialogue with the protestors outside of the Student Government Offices. Paige is trying to “silence” everyone by agreeing to the demands of the protestors. I am sorry, but could you clarify what definition you are using when you use the word “silence” in that context?

    “…regardless of legality, showing empathy towards students — whether they are former student leaders or anyone for that matter — is not incriminating. ”

    So tell me Jesse, where did you get your law degree from? I thought you were an English Instructor at Wichita State University and not someone who has their Juris Doctorate? I mean, there is a valid reason why the Bar Association of each state has education requirements before you can sit for the Bar Exam and obtain a license to practice as an attorney. I think giving legal advice is outside the scope of your credentials.

    [Reply]

    Rex Reply:

    Dear Tex, why can’t someone give any advice. I worked as a basic cashier at a grocery store and would pull off people’s (unhealthy food) and tell them they shouldn’t eat that food if I noticed they had medication for high blood pressure/cholesterol. I did that yet I’m not a doctor. I give students advise on which classes to take yet I’m not an academic advisor. I redid some electrical work in a house yet I’m not an electrician. I’ve helped people understand financies and loans yet I’m not an accountant. I’ve helped people with mechanics yet I’m not a mechanic. Sometimes Tex, just because people have an opinion doesn’t mean you can blow them off because they don’t have a PhD.

    [Reply]

    Tex Reply:

    Actually it means I can do exactly that and blow them off. If you are not a lawyer I would not want you representing me in a court of law or giving me specific legal advice. If you are not a doctor I would not want you attempting to diagnose an ailment or performing complex medical procedures on my body.

    All of the examples you provided are broad, non-complex items that do not necessarily require a specific skill set, training, or education. I am talking about specific advice and services that are offered by licensed professionals—please refer to my comment above as you seem to be confused about what I was talking about.

    There is a reason why certain professions have a requisite amount of education, training and/or licensing procedures—it is to ensure that those licensed professionals have an understanding of the intricacies of their profession and the laws that govern them.

    Also, there is this wonderful thing called spellcheck that you should really look into—it usually only takes a few minutes and saves you from looking like a boob.

    [Reply]