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The Sunflower

Wichita State's independent, student-run news source

The Sunflower

Wichita State's independent, student-run news source

The Sunflower

OPINION: Happy holidays is the superior seasonal greeting

The+entrance+of+Sedgwick+County+Zoo+lit+up+with+the+Wild+Lights+showing+on+Nov.+11.+Asian+Lantern+sculptures+following+the+story+of+Alice+in+Wonderland+are+being+displayed+throughout+the+zoo+during+the+night+of+Oct.+11+to+Dec.+17%2C+2023.
Cheyanne Tull
The entrance of Sedgwick County Zoo lit up with the Wild Lights showing on Nov. 11. Asian Lantern sculptures following the story of Alice in Wonderland are being displayed throughout the zoo during the night of Oct. 11 to Dec. 17, 2023.

It’s that time of year when everyone busts out their stockings and decorates their trees. Every home prepares cookies to set out for Santa Claus and to sit in a circle by the fire. We look at our families and friends, smile with Yuletide joy, and say, “merry Christmas.”  

But this doesn’t describe everyone. When we say “merry Christmas” to our families, friends, neighbors and complete strangers, we convey that it encompasses everyone. 88% of Americans plan on celebrating Christmas, but we should still consider the remaining 12%. One simple way to do that is to say “happy holidays” instead of “merry Christmas.”

Some will argue that saying “happy holidays” is part of the “leftist agenda” and the “war on Christmas.” Yes, Democrats tend to be more likely to say “happy holidays” and Republicans to say “merry Christmas” instead. But this should not be a political issue. If this is the biggest issue in someone’s life, they should reevaluate their priorities. This should be a matter of being considerate during the season of kindness, and “happy Holidays” is just more inclusive.

By wishing someone “merry Christmas,” you are, in theory, already showing consideration for the other person and trying to spread some cheer. Saying “happy holidays” achieves the same thing without making unnecessary assumptions and potentially alienating the recipient.

Additionally, while I will not say it does not happen, I have never met a person who insists on only wishing others a happy Hanukkah or Kwanzaa, or anything other than Christmas, just because they celebrate that holiday.

If someone does get offended by being wished happy holidays instead of a merry Christmas, just wish them the merry Christmas they want and move on. It is not a big enough issue to warrant an argument.

I do not believe that saying “merry Christmas” automatically makes someone a bad person, or that saying “happy holidays” automatically makes anyone a better person. At the end of the day, it just isn’t that deep. But both take the same amount of effort and convey the same general message of well-being and seasonal joy. So why not choose the more inclusive option?

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About the Contributors
Avery Gathright, Reporter
Avery Gathright is a first-year reporter for The Sunflower. Gathright is a secondary education major with an emphasis in English. She hopes to eventually teach AP Literature. Gathright uses she/her pronouns.
Cheyanne Tull, Reporter
Cheyanne Tull is a first year reporter, photographer and illustrator for The Sunflower. Tull is double majoring in graphic design and journalism & media production. She hopes to work for outdoor publications in the future combining creativity, nature, and rock climbing. Tull uses she/her pronouns.

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