The Wade brothers shine on College Basketball’s biggest stage

Nelson+and+Tiffany+Wade+prepare+to+watch+their+sons+Trey+and+Trevin+during+WSU%27s+First+Four+matchup+against+Drake+on+Thursday.

Joe Baker/The Sunflower

Nelson and Tiffany Wade prepare to watch their sons Trey and Trevin during WSU’s First Four matchup against Drake on Thursday.

For parents Nelson and Tiffany Wade, they had aspirations for their sons Trey and Trevin to play together at the highest level of collegiate basketball. 

Before attending Wichita State, Trey Wade had played his collegiate basketball career at a few schools. Trey spent two seasons at the University of Texas El Paso and redshirted his true freshman season. Wade transferred to Wichita State from South Plains College in Levelland, Texas and in 2019, he was rated as the No. 23 junior college recruit.

In his junior campaign and in his first season as a Shocker, Trey started 27 of the team’s 31 games, a team-high. Trey averaged 7.4 points-per-game and 5.4 rebounds for the 2019-20 season.

Trey has had similar success in his senior campaign. The six-foot-six forward averaged 6.7 points-per-game while grabbing 5.6 rebounds per game.

Trevin Wade played with his brother, Trey at South Plains College in his freshman season. After his freshman campaign, Trevin transferred to Georgia Highlands College in Rome, Georgia and was named a Second Team NJCAA Division I All-American as a sophomore. 

This season, Trevin appeared in nine games for the Shockers. The five-foot-11 guard averaged 2.1 points-per-game and scored a season-high eight points against Newman University on Dec. 30.

According to Trey and Trevin’s father, it was a plan to have the two brothers play basketball together again.

“It’s actually like a dream come true,” Nelson said. “We always wanted them to play college basketball at the highest level and we felt coming to Wichita State this year together would be a great opportunity for us to put together something special to make it to the tournament.”

The mother of the Wade brothers, Tiffany, said she just wants to see Trevin and Trey happy and to play NCAA Tournament basketball.

“As mom, I always want to see my boys happy and getting as far as they can,” Tiffany said. “It’s been a long road. I’m just happy that they have the opportunity to be here at March Madness and I know they’re excited.”

Emotions were running high last Sunday, when the Shockers’ NCAA tournament fate was undecided due to a 60-59 loss against Cincinnati on March 13. It was well expected that if the Shockers squeaked into the NCAA tournament, it would be as one of the last teams accepted into the tournament field.

When Nelson and Tiffany found out their sons would be playing in the NCAA tournament together, they had emotions of shock and excitement.

“Oh man we were just like the team, we were excited,” Nelson said, “We were a little nervous, because we were at the Cincinnati game when they lost.”

“I’m always a nervous wreck, because I always want to see them do well,” Tiffany said. “Just to get here is just awesome, I’m excited for them, I’m excited for the family. I have family that lives close by, so we are all trying to get here to cheer them on and make it to the next level.”

Trey Wade has yet to announce whether he intends to return to Wichita State for another season or graduate and opt to play professional basketball. Whether or not the road ends in Indiana for Trey in a Shocker uniform, Nelson is just thankful and proud of Trey’s collegiate basketball experience.

“Win or lose, it’s been a great experience, it’s been a fantastic experience,” Nelson said. “This is a great opportunity for Trey to go out and shine and Wichita State to do, what we came to do and that is win.”

Wichita State lost to Drake in the First Four in heartbreaking fashion 53-52 on Thursday evening. On Friday, it was announced that Trevin Wade is transferring from Wichita State and he has entered his name into the NCAA transfer portal.