Student fees budget to be voted on Wednesday

The+Student+Government+Association+of+Wichita+State+University+discussed+a+proposal+that+would+lower+campaign+budgets.+
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Student fees budget to be voted on Wednesday

The Student Government Association of Wichita State University discussed a proposal that would lower campaign budgets.

The Student Government Association of Wichita State University discussed a proposal that would lower campaign budgets.

Evan Pflugradt

The Student Government Association of Wichita State University discussed a proposal that would lower campaign budgets.

Evan Pflugradt

Evan Pflugradt

The Student Government Association of Wichita State University discussed a proposal that would lower campaign budgets.

If student fees budget cuts go according to committee recommendations, the college of fine arts could start charging students for tickets to their programs again.

The college of fine arts has requested $35,000 in student fees to cover programming costs for fiscal year 2018 — the same amount they received the prior year. But the student fees committee plans on cutting their budget by $15,000 this time around.

“Quite frankly, it costs the college of fine arts more than $35,000 to subsidize the free distribution of tickets to Wichita State students,” Rodney Miller, dean of the college of fine arts, said to student senate last week.

“Without a $35,000 subsidy, we would be compelled to go back to charg[ing] students for tickets,” he said.

Ashwin Govindarajan, treasurer for student government, said that the cuts were made based on “how many students each program touches.”

Among the programs and organizations expected to have their budget requests significantly cut are Shocker Safe Ride, the international office, and Mikrokosmos, Wichita State’s literary journal.

“This isn’t really an expense that should be covered by student fees,” Govindarajan said about Mikrokosmos. “It should be something overseen by the department of English.”

The literary journal has requested a budget of $4,210 for next fiscal year but is expected to receive just under half of that. Govindarajan said there was talk of turning the operations of the journal into a class for students to take.

“The reason we kept (funding) flat this year instead of cutting them completely was that way they have a bridge … some kind of money to operate next year before they move on to a class,” he said.

SGA meets at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday to decide whether or not to approve the proposed budget.