Behind-the-scenes of WSU’s TikTok page

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Mia Hennen/ The Sunflower

Social Media Intern for the Office of Admissions, Destanee Brigman-Reed, records WuShock for the WSU TikTok page on Jan. 24. Brigman-Reed took charge of most of the filming and content on the page.

In March 2021, Wichita State created their own TikTok page, providing students and other users the opportunity to see WuShock and other relatable college content.  The page is run by two students, and has gained almost 4000 followers.

While much of the content that appears on the page is geared to current or prospective students, those behind-the-scenes try to create an account that anyone can go to for fun or informational content.

Destanee Brigman-Reed, social media intern for the office of admissions, handles most of the content development and execution while Lane Smith, recruitment & communication specialist in undergraduate admissions, manages and oversees the TikTok page.

“I always envisioned it like this: a student can come to Wichita State’s [TikTok] whether they’re going to Wichita State or anywhere else for good pertinent information to use anywhere,” Smith said.

The idea of a WSU TikTok began with Brigman-Reed scrolling through her For You Page and reflecting on the difficulties surrounding virtually attending college at the time. 

“I was like, ‘It’d be really cool if we made a collegiate one and could share it with prospective students to help them especially during that virtual time,’” Brigman-Reed said.

Unlike other social media that WSU is on, TikTok has the ability to reach a wider audience and tends to be used by people between the ages of 16 and 24, falling in line with the age of typical current or potential college students.

“It’s important to use those older social media like Instagram and Facebook, but they are getting towards an older audience and outgrown,” Brigman-Reed said. 

Answers to questions like what students should bring to their dorm and best places to study on campus can be found on the page as well. Brigman-Reed, a junior, spoke of her experience as a student that influenced the content on the page.

“I was a first-generation student, so I didn’t know what I needed to bring to college or what to expect for classes,” Brigman-Reed said. “The page gives students who aren’t too familiar with the college process an ‘in’ to what they need to know.”

Outside of the informational content, videos following the most recent trends can be found with WuShock or other students at the center.

“I love creating it with students across campus that I wouldn’t normally see and hearing their stories or different tips,” Brigman-Reed said. 

Since the page’s inception, the account has gained over 3,900 followers over a period of ten months. 

“We had a video that had 105,000 views and had a few others that had over 10,000,”  Smith said. “It’s been kind of neat to see what content works well and what people like to see on there. We try to give the people what they want.”

If students have questions or want to be in a TikTok, they can reach out via email to Smith or Brigman-Reed or comment on one of the videos.

“We see everything,” Smith said.  “They can reach out anytime they want to.”